Day 4: Redesign a Book Cover

I wasn’t able to post my 4th day drawing as I got busy with a lot of things. Actually, I did the drawing some two days ago, but it’s only now that I got the chance to post it.

Anyway, The Little Prince is one of the first books that I read. It’s also one of my favorite gifts to nephews and nieces. The Little Prince is actually a simple story; what gives it a deeper meaning is the Little Prince himself – and all the experiences and learnings he imparts in the book. All very basic things that we should all know about by the time we learn the difference of right from left. Sadly, though, most of what the Little Prince and his friends sort of teaches us in the book have been buried deep in many web-laden memory baskets; forgotten and neglected. If only all of us would believe, think and act as the Little Prince did, in our own simple ways, our world will be a better, more positive place.

My redesign is very simple as, like what I keep saying, I don’t really know how to draw. But basically, it captures what I remember most about the book – the flower that gives each one of us hope and the inspiration to change positively. The flower also symbolizes many of the things that are better “felt by the heart” than seen by the eyes. Like friendship and love.

THE FOX TELLS THE LITTLE PRINCE: “Here is my secret. It’s quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes. . . . It’s the time that you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important. . . . People have forgotten this truth,” the fox said, “But you mustn’t forget it. You become responsible for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose. . . .”

Other books that stimulate the mind: By the River Piedra I Sat Down and Wept, The Alchemist and Eleven Minutes by Paulo Coehlo; Tuesdays With Morrie, The Five People You Meet in Heaven and For One More Day by Mitch Albom; Living, Loving and Learning by Leo Buscaglia; Notes to Myself: My Struggle to Become a Person by Hugh Prather; Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach; Peaks and Valleys by Spencer Johnson, M.D. and The BIBLE.

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